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Debussy: Images, Estampes, Children’s Corner CD review – high-definition impressionism

Steven Osborne
Rigour and steel … pianist Steven Osborne. Photograph: Ben Ealovega

I’ve always loved the way Steven Osborne plays French music – for the flux and febrile atmosphere, yes, but more for the rigour and steel. Forget any cliches of hazy impressionism, Osborne brings directness and muscle, and the boldest aspects of texture, form and image stand out in ultra high definition as a result.

His latest Debussy album is a perfect example. The goldfish of Poisson d’Or move in jerks and sudden flashes. The water droplets in Reflets dans l’Eau are super crisp, like pointillism writ large. At the end of Doctor Gradus ad Parnassum the tune rings out like a defiant shout. It’s not pretty but it is exhilarating. There is gentleness too – try The Snow Is Dancing, whispered and supple. But what makes Osborne’s interpretations so revelatory is his willingness to state in plain terms what many pianists make blurry. It shows up the astounding modernism of Debussy’s piano music.

This article titled "Debussy: Images, Estampes, Children’s Corner CD review – high-definition impressionism" was written by Kate Molleson, for The Guardian on Thursday 12 October 2017 02.30pm

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